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FRAMES Artist-in-Residence November / December 2021: Cynthia Gladis

PART 1 – NOVEMBER 15, 2021

W. Scott Olsen in conversation with Cynthia Gladis, introducing our Artist-in-Residence, talking about her photography, designer background influencing her work, and about the way she is planning to approach her FRAMES assignment.

Leave your questions to Cynthia in the comment section below and she will do her best to answer them all.


PART 2 – NOVEMBER 22, 2021

Hello FRAMES!

I’m so honored, and excited, by Tomasz’s invitation to be November’s FRAMES Artist-in-Residence and hope that you’ll find how I approach this interesting and a bit entertaining. For this first installment I’ve taken you with me on a photo walk, and I’ll eventually be sharing my raw files vs. the final images, and also discussing which images, if any, I think are suitable for FRAMES. Hopefully at the end of the month I’ll have a small portfolio of images that will work!

As some of you know, I love to try new photographic techniques and to experiment, in general. Once I got over my initial terror at the prospect of doing this, I quickly decided that I’d like to record photo walks with a GoPro. Have I ever used a GoPro? No. Have I ever shot video of any kind? No. So it just follows that I’ve never edited video, either. This is my first effort, and now that I know you will be watching it, a slight bit of terror is creeping back. I normally don’t talk so much and I’m more used to writing than talking these days, so please forgive my copious use of “ummm” – if I’d tried to edit out all my “ummms” I wouldn’t have made the deadline!

You will notice that my raw files show up on screen only briefly. I’ve never shared raw files before, and I’m not a “straight out of the camera” type. I’d rather spend my time walking and composing rather than adjusting camera settings, while I collect the raw material that I bring to life in post. But trust me, you will see them in all their underexposed glory (I shoot that way intentionally – I’d rather brighten photos in post than tone down something that’s overexposed) when I do the side-by-side comparisons.

A few acknowledgements: Thank you again, Tomasz, for this opportunity, and for the FRAMES community, which inspires me on a daily basis. Thank you, Scott Olsen, for the great interview. Special thanks go to FRAMES member Shane McGeehan, for generously letting me “pick his brain” about video and for encouraging my approach. I’d also like to acknowledge that the transition and brief musical clip I used were downloaded, legally, from my Adobe Photography Plan account. I recorded the sound of my Fuji X-T2’s shutter with my iPhone and used that throughout the video.

I hope you enjoy this installment, and I look forward to producing the next one!

Cynthia

Leave your questions to Cynthia in the comment section below and she will do her best to answer them all.

PART 3 – NOVEMBER 29, 2021

Hello FRAMES!

As promised, in this installment I’ll show you my “befores and afters” – my RAW vs. processed files. There is a PDF attached to view after you’ve watched the video, so that you can look much more closely at the images in a higher resolution than you’ll see in this video.

The primary deliverable for my tenure as Artist-in-Residence is a portfolio of 5-10 images. As I head toward that goal I’ll show you how I evaluate and critique my own photos to decide which ones, if any, are “FRAMES-worthy.”

As I go through my photos in the video, I categorize each image in one of three ways:

1. “Meh.” These are the photos that might have seemed like a good idea at the time, but just didn’t pan out the way I saw them in my mind’s eye. Or, they suffer from me not using the right lens for the job. They normally never see the light of day, but you will see some, here.

2. “Solid.” These images range from semi-solid (a step up from meh, and the ones I sit on, sometimes forever) to rock solid, which are the images I’m comfortable sharing on social media, in genre groups, on my own page with a little story, and on my website. I allow myself a lot of latitude in the “solid” category, because I never share an image that I’m not pleased with on some level.

3. “Personal Best.” These are the images that I feel best reflect me and my way of seeing, and have a unique element or feature – usually something a bit quirky or unexpected – that makes them mine. These are the images that get me excited, that I can’t wait to share. And sometimes I don’t realize I have one until I see it in post. These are the “FRAMES-worthy” images I hope to end up with for this project.

I hope you enjoy this installment, and I’d love to hear if any of you go through a similar thought process in evaluating your own work.

Cynthia

You can download the accompanying PDF file here.

Leave your questions to Cynthia in the comment section below and she will do her best to answer them all.

Comments (73):

  1. Paul Sanders

    November 15, 2021 at 13:17

    Really looking forward to this Cynthia- good luck

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 15, 2021 at 14:24

      Thanks so much, Paul! I enjoyed your segments a lot and you set the bar high for me and all who follow! This is a lot of fun and I hope that I can keep people as interested as you did.

      Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 15, 2021 at 17:15

      I’m so glad to hear that, Jan! Thanks.

      Reply
  2. Kate Barclay

    November 15, 2021 at 17:43

    Exciting, I am looking forward to your Photowalks Cynthia

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:48

      Thanks so much for your comment, Kate! I hope you enjoy what I’m going to do!

      Reply
  3. Sonja Bowden

    November 15, 2021 at 17:57

    What an enjoyable interview. Very relaxed and relatable. I’m looking forward to more!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:48

      Sonja, thank you so much (and for your encouragement as well!). I can’t wait for you to see the first installment and to see if you recognize a scene in it that made me think of you — the type of scene that makes both of do the happy dance!

      Reply
  4. Elizabeth+Klanac

    November 15, 2021 at 19:27

    Wonderful introduction Cynthia… I gained a lot of knowledge from your first podcast, but I have always been amazed with your photo walks. Your design background plays very prominently in your images and I like and appreciate that. I too like that sense of order. I love the clean lines and appreciation of space and shape and light and shadow. I do see your sense of humor, and I like that very much because I need more laughter in my life. I love the shopping cart up against the building it’s like he’s peeking out. And of course the target balls. But I do enjoy how you see. It has opened my eyes and changed my perspective in the short time I’ve known you. Thank you for a great introduction.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 15, 2021 at 20:20

      And thank you for your wonderful comment, Elizabeth! I really hope you enjoy my first installment and the photowalk, during which I am very much myself. I have to work on the “ums,” LOL, will do that for the next time!

      Reply
  5. Danielle Labonte

    November 15, 2021 at 19:35

    Great interview! And I’m looking forward to the next instalments and the walks!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:12

      Thanks so much, Danielle! I’m so pleased to see that you’ll be able to access the content!

      Reply
  6. Bill Fosdick

    November 15, 2021 at 20:35

    I am very much looking forward to your next discoveries and am curious to know if you revisit a site to find different light; continue to shoot from different angles; or nudge the odd object into or out of your frame to capture the image you conceive? Questions I hope will come up during your residency and walks. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:14

      Bill, thanks for your comment, which couldn’t have been more prescient! I’m just about finished putting together my first installment and I think you’ll find that much of what you asked is answered!

      Reply
  7. David Mark

    November 15, 2021 at 21:47

    Thank you so much for your inspiring introduction Cynthia. You have powerful design DNA, and I loved the simple, clean lines with homorous juxtapositions

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:15

      David, thank you! I’m glad you enjoyed the images and can appreciate this way that I see!

      Reply
  8. Richard Hutson

    November 15, 2021 at 22:01

    Cynthia, I’m really looking forward to seeing the images you make and why you make them.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:16

      Thanks very much, Richard, and I hope you enjoy learning about my process.

      Reply
  9. Eric Falk

    November 16, 2021 at 00:48

    I look forward to your photowalks. I see a lot of William Eggleston in your work and he is my favorite. BTW–I grew up in Monmouth County and spent LOTS of time hanging out at Sandy Hook and Fort Hancock. Know it well.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:20

      Wow, Eric, thank you! I have come to appreciate Eggleston’s work very much, but I have to be honest with you — when I started on my photography journey I had never heard of him, in fact I didn’t pay attention to any of the greats when I was starting out because I was afraid they would influence me and I wanted to “do my own thing” and see what emerged. Now, a comment like yours pleases the heck out of me. And I’m happy to hear that you grew up in Jersey, I think you will really enjoy the first installment I have planned, and my way of speaking will probably come as no surprise to you. I wish I could put in the laughing emoji here!

      Reply
  10. Richard+Young

    November 16, 2021 at 01:16

    Very fine work, your development is worth watching so have fun with your residency. I am always interested in the genealogy of artists, where the magic started and how the artist took it forward. Your work feels like it is extended from Edward Hopper but I could be wrong.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:23

      Richard, thanks for your comment, it elicited another “wow” from me. If you read my reply to Eric above, you’ll see that I tried not to be influenced by other photographers, but I have spent a lot of time in museums and have always loved Hopper’s work — it’s interesting to think that photographically I might have been influenced by a painter. I love his work and appreciate what you said very much!

      Reply
      • Richard+Young

        November 16, 2021 at 13:38

        Thanks! I think that it is fine to be influenced by others so long as you dont just copy. So, look at the long list of artist who crossed the boundary …. painters who then transitioned to become great photographers eg Cartier-Bresson, Saul Leiter, Avedon or painters who took photographs eg Warhol, Degas, Hockney, Rauschenberg, Twombly, Estes, Chuck Close etc. I am a painter who takes photographs.

        Reply
  11. Rivki Locker

    November 16, 2021 at 02:03

    New Jersey resident here! Looking forward to joining you!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 16, 2021 at 13:24

      Rivki, it’s so great to hear from fellow Jerseyans, and I really hope you enjoy my first installment — I hope you recognize the first place I visited. You’ll see!

      Reply
  12. Giulio

    November 22, 2021 at 15:45

    Great interview, sincere and fun to listen to, yet a bit…. controlled! naahh, just kidding, it was very spontaneous 😀 And very nice photos. I do like the cleanness of your shots. Just one question, would you say your vision was also inspired by William Egglestone’s or Luigi Ghirri’s work?

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 22, 2021 at 15:51

      Thanks so much, Giulio! And “controlled,” that cracked me up. Wait till you see my photo walk videos. Let’s just say I take my photography seriously but myself, much less so! I honestly tried not to be influenced by anyone — back when I started my photography journey I wasn’t paying attention to the “greats,” as I wanted to do my own thing and see what “developed” (pardon the pun). I honestly had never heard of Ghirri until now, thanks for pointing me in his direction. I’m flattered! I like to photograph many different things, including construction sites and abandoned, messy places, but I do lean more towards clean and graphic.

      Reply
  13. Sonja Bowden

    November 22, 2021 at 23:40

    I just took the photo walk with you, Cynthia, and it was so much fun! You see and experience things very much the way I do. I loved your choices of scenes and subjects. It was a joy to hear your thoughts as you walked along. Thanks for creating and sharing this very entertaining video.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 23, 2021 at 00:48

      And thank you for your wonderful comment, Sonja. I do know that we “see” alike, and I thought of you immediately when I saw the “porta john festival” scene!

      Reply
  14. peter van eekelen

    November 23, 2021 at 00:46

    That was greatly interesting, Cynthia. Really cool to see you walk about as I’m sure we all do, and in particular to watch you make your shot decisions because that’s what makes the difference. I already know that after your PP I’ll perfectly understand some of your choices, even though at times I would walk right the other way 😀 I’m looking forward to your next walk, and of course to the final results and your commentary on that!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 23, 2021 at 00:51

      Peter, thanks for watching, and I’m so pleased to hear that you thought it was interesting! I’m being very honest in the presentation of the photos, and you’ll see that some of the images I make I end up scrapping, because they looked better in my mind’s eye than in reality! But sometimes you just don’t know until you make the image — I think the trick is to be honest with yourself and be able to recognize when an image is “meh” rather than “wow!”

      Reply
      • peter van eekelen

        November 23, 2021 at 12:35

        Cynthia, you’re absolutely right. This meh-wow recognising ability is as difficult as the whole shooting and PP process itself :-). I really admire your guts to take us along in the ride!

        Reply
  15. Gail Orgias

    November 23, 2021 at 01:17

    Where to start – absolutely loved your Fort Hancock walk – ‘almost’ as good as being there – know many of us will wish! The place is so painterly – great architecture, wide expanse of sky, those trees & perfect light. Enjoyed hearing your thought process as you were taking the photos – you have a wonderful eye for composition – colour, symetry, and a sense of quirkiness as well. Your photos work so well in colour – did you convert any into B&W. Thanks Cynthia and looking forward to your next photo walk.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 23, 2021 at 14:25

      Gail, thanks so much for watching, and I’m so glad you enjoyed it! You will see the final photos next Monday — I ended up enjoying the muted color more than I expected, but find that I really come alive on a a sunny day, which I was fortunate enough to get for my second walk! Sometimes sunny days make for the kind of black and white I like, with strong contrast. I’m enjoying this project so much, and it’s teaching me a lot about how I truly like to shoot, and how I self curate — so it’s been interesting to me as well!

      Reply
  16. Earl Rogers,Jr

    November 23, 2021 at 01:25

    I like the video even though it had a sad moment to it. It’s a shame to have let a whole military base Close down when we have so many service members overseas that we could have brought home and kept that post alive.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 23, 2021 at 16:57

      Earl, thanks for watching. Keep in mind that Fort Hancock is well over 100 years old at this point, and the buildings are crumbling. They are being brought back to life, but at this point it might be better served as a historic monument/science center/living museum than living quarters.

      Reply
  17. Caroline Jackson

    November 23, 2021 at 07:39

    Cynthia, your photos are uplifting, but the composition is OH delightful. Looking forward to your photowalk, and your thought bubble. Cheers!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 23, 2021 at 14:28

      Caroline, I’m so glad that you’ll be able to access the content! We’ve always seemed like kindred spirits so you let me know once you’ve listened to me “walk and talk” (although I’m from NJ so it’s “wawk and tawk”). Thanks for the kind words on my photos, and I hope you enjoy this — I’m having such a great time with it!

      Reply
  18. Lowell Wolff

    November 23, 2021 at 14:55

    Really enjoyed your photo walk! Found my eye being drawn to same design elements you found fascinating. I am anxious to see which images make the cut and what happens to them in the post-processing. Apologies, in advance, for a gear-head question: Tell me about the GoPro setup, gimbal, mic etc. Simple (I hope) and very effective story telling device! Thank you for sharing your thoughts via your photo walk.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 23, 2021 at 16:55

      Hi Lowell, thanks for watching the video, and I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I’m looking forward to showing everyone my “before and after” photos, it should be interesting to anyone who enjoys post processing as much as I do. I don’t mind the gear-head question at all, I love talking about this stuff. The setup is simple, and I had fun doing the research and assembling what I needed! I used a GoPro Hero 10 (buy extra batteries!!!), it’s the new version that has very good stabilization (so I didn’t need a gimbal). I alternated between carrying it on the “shorty stick,” which is tiny and light and quite enjoyable to use, and the “3 Way 2.0” which is fantastic because you can hold it farther away from yourself to avoid the dreaded selfie distortion (I read that our arms would have to be 5 feet long to avoid that, LOL). I also used the RODE Wireless Go external microphone, and it’s fantastic. It also works well through my computer (you need special cords for that — reach out if you need more info, happy to send you links). The only negative about the RODE system is that they give you these little fur wind reducers that don’t stay on well at all — I lost one of the two they gave me, it just blew right off! I ended up taping the second one to the unit with surgical tape and, even though RODE is sending me a replacement, I will not use the little furry thing without tape, ever again! Whew, aren’t you glad you asked?

      Reply
  19. Lowell Wolff

    November 23, 2021 at 18:55

    Thanks for the thorough response. I love that the video (as insight your thought process) does not become the primary focus – very effective! What do you use to edit your video? Moving on to your website…

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 23, 2021 at 22:00

      Lowell, thank you. And I used Adobe’s Premiere Rush, I discovered that it now comes bundled with the photography package of PS and LR!

      Reply
  20. Ella Hudson

    November 23, 2021 at 22:46

    Enjoyed the walk about. Another place to add to our lengthy list of interesting places to visit! I’m looking forward to seeing the before and after shots from this video!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 24, 2021 at 15:07

      Thanks for watching, Ella, and for your comment. So glad you enjoyed the photo walk! Fort Hancock is a special place, and I hope you enjoy the photos!

      Reply
  21. Lowell Wolff

    November 23, 2021 at 22:48

    Thanks, you have been most helpful! Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

    Reply
  22. Cynthia+Gladis

    November 23, 2021 at 23:48

    Lowell, it’s been my pleasure, and I wish you and yours the same!

    Reply
  23. Tua Rahikainen

    November 26, 2021 at 11:04

    Thank you Cynthia .
    I love the interesting area and your explanations. Very similar to my ideas ! Pity you do not live in Finland. We should take a photo walk to a world heritage fortification on an Island outside Helsinki.

    Reply
  24. Tua Rahikainen

    November 26, 2021 at 11:08

    Which are your camera settings . I always use manual mode and set the best WB. Do you take many shots of the same scene even when they are not moving as I do to avoid shaking or tilted horizon. I could hear only one click .

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 26, 2021 at 14:52

      Tua, thanks for watching. I’m glad you enjoyed the video and “tour” of Fort Hancock, and I’m glad to hear that we are kindred spirits! I’d love to travel more in the future, particularly to your area, but for right now I don’t mind staying put on the east coast of the US. There’s always something to explore! My camera settings for a walk like this are typically f/8 or f/11 and whatever shutter speed gives me what the camera says is the proper exposure, which is typically underexposed but which I actually prefer. I always try to use the fastest shutter speed that I can so I go back and forth between those two apertures. Since I shoot raw I don’t set the white balance till I’m in post. I used to shoot multiples of each scene but working with film for a while has cured me of that. On this walk I shot one or two versions of each because I like to “work a scene,” but in the interest of time and to keep the video “tight” I only included one shot. I shot the entire video with GoPro. When you hear a click, I had stopped the video, put the GoPro down (or held it and my camera at the same time) and shot the picture with my camera. I inserted the shutter sound (which I recorded on my iPhone) and the raw file into the video during editing. So you are not actually hearing me take the picture, but I’m glad that you thought you were!

      Reply
  25. Michael Cox

    November 29, 2021 at 16:02

    I’ve only begun watching–first episode. Immediately drawn to your philosophy of finding stuff, not setting out for something. Lately I’ve been feeling pressure (totally self-imposed) to “have a project” and to focus my photography on that project, but I don’t have one. I just don’t. I like walking, I like photographing things that interest me, and where I live (Vancouver BC) it’s really difficult with the weather (in the winter: grey, shadowless, and rainy) to do either. So now I’m about to start a much-delayed revamp of my website. I look forward to the virtual photo walk and your post process tutorial.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 29, 2021 at 16:18

      Michael, I’m so pleased to hear you’re watching! My photo walks often become a project on their own (like this first one, Fort Hancock) or, as you will see in my second photowalk that will come out on December 6, I end up with several groups of images that can stand alone as projects. I just like to keep an open mind because I never know what I might find. And I’m also not afraid to just have some fun, as when I was out to dinner with some friends recently, and my Chicken Francese was smiling at me! Of course I had to snap it, and ended up having more fun with that one silly photo. We can’t be afraid to have fun. Just one more thing — I am not doing a processing tutorial, I am showing the befores and afters, but focusing more on how I self curate and critique my own photos as I head towards the goal of 5-10 final images. I hope you are able to watch all the segments!

      Reply
      • Michael Cox

        November 29, 2021 at 17:28

        Thanks Cynthia, I”ll keep watching. I actually only discovered Frames recently (and subscribed). While I respect that you won’t be discussing the processing, I do have a question regarding consistency. When you have created a look after framing and making lines parallel, when you’re done with grading, dodging, burning, etc., on an image, do you use LR’s copy settings? How do you maintain a consistent look across multiple images to give a colour/exposure cohesiveness to a set of images (along with the subject matter, framing, and so on)? I tend to work toward making each image stand out, but getting a set of them to feel like part of a whole, of a series, is definitely more challenging. Appreciate your thoughts….

        Reply
        • Cynthia+Gladis

          November 29, 2021 at 18:18

          Michael, I do use LR’s copy feature when I have a series of photos that I’d like to ensure match as far as their overall look. As I mention at the end of this new video, I’m not much of a preset user but I do like Fuji’s film simulations, particularly Classic Chrome, which I used for this set. I typically treat each image individually, particularly when it comes to blue skies — sometimes they are too washed out, and sometimes too saturated, so I end up adjusting them to work for each individual photo. The only thing about my process that is set in stone is the way I bring everything into Lightroom, keep my catalog (I only have one catalog that goes back to 2015) well organized and backed up, and the fact that I follow my own filing system. Otherwise I’d have a virtual shoebox full of photos that I couldn’t find again if my life depended on it!

          Reply
  26. Jim

    November 29, 2021 at 17:11

    Thank you so much for the walkthrough of your photo selections. I liked that you talked through your reasoning for each one and did not spend time on post processing explanations. I don’t have any graphic design training but i really appreciate your approach to these images. I feel good thinking I would have made the same selections. Maybe I’m not weird after all. LOL. Thanks again. Great job!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 30, 2021 at 15:23

      Jim, thanks for your comment. I’m pleased that you appreciate the way I approached this project, and I’m glad to hear that you would have made some of the same selections as I did! And it’s never “weird,” but “interesting!” Thanks again.

      Reply
  27. Ted Scott

    November 29, 2021 at 17:35

    From the bottom of my architect’s heart: thank you for correcting the converging verticals!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 30, 2021 at 15:41

      Ted, your comment made me chuckle, and I thank you. I try to keep in mind that “perfectly vertical” sometimes looks too “perfectly strange” and I adjust accordingly. I’m thinking of my image of the house with the crumbly front porch, because that one drove me a bit crazy and I ended up having to re-introduce a bit of the convergence. I actually enjoy working on some challenging verticals without using guides, correcting them till I feel they are right. But on others, guides save me!

      Reply
  28. Bill Fosdick

    November 29, 2021 at 20:11

    Loved your commentary on each shot and why you rated them the way you did. You asked what others do and I know that I use LR stars when I first view my raw shots. One star means come back and edit. Two or three means worth keeping track of and then, after editing I may assign four stars to those I show friends and five stars to the ones that I will print in an annual album.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 29, 2021 at 21:15

      Thanks for commenting, Bill! Glad you enjoyed my commentary. I have to admit that I came up with my “meh,” “solid,” and “personal best” rating system for Frames, but it’s pretty much what goes through my head when I’m going through my photos! I don’t use a lot of LR’s categorizing or ranking features — after a shoot I usually know that I have one or two images I have high hopes for and can’t wait to see, and I often process those first. The rest I sit on until the mood strikes me to look through them. Consequently I have a lot of images sitting in LR that have yet to see the light of day. I was working under a deadline here so I went through and processed everything in a couple of days. The only images I toss right at the beginning are of the “I shot my leg by mistake” variety. There weren’t too many complete duds (just some “mehs”) in this bunch, so Frames is seeing basically everything I shot that day. I love LR though, I’m really a big fan, particularly since they upgraded the masking!

      Reply
      • Michael Cox

        November 30, 2021 at 00:15

        Yes that masking upgrade in the latest CC desktop Lightroom is a game-changer. I hardly need to use Photoshop at all except for layer-based work. But oddly, I still find that PRINTING from LR is not up to snuff, and will either export into PS a TIFF file to hand over to my printer, an Epson SC P800, or now that Epson has revamped its printing utility, use that. LR’s focus seems to be on wedding photographers with all the presets for multi-image layouts and so on.

        Reply
        • Cynthia+Gladis

          November 30, 2021 at 16:07

          Michael, thanks for sharing that link. I have never tried to print from Lightroom. I don’t print that often, but when I do I just export the photo at the specs the printer requires. One of these days I’d like to get my own photo printer and do it myself, but that has yet to happen! And yes, the masking upgrade is indeed a game changer!

          Reply
          • Michael Cox

            November 30, 2021 at 16:37

            If you get a photo printer, do yourself a favour and get one that will print reasonably large. The paper and ink are the killer costs, but still less expensive than getting custom printing done (unless its the drugstore variety). Epson SureColor P800 is now superseded by the P900 (and one big advantage to the newer model is that it doesn’t waste ink converting from Matte Black to Photo Black). Canon makes good ones too but we have an excellent Epson dealer here where I got mine lightly used). It’s a whole different set of knowledge, trial-and-error, printing. As for papers, while Epson makes incredible papers (and their printers are, out of the box, set up for their own paper, naturally), Red River papers are beautiful and the documentation that comes with each of their papers describes the settings for Epson or Canon printers. But ink: OMG, the printer I have uses 8 cartridges, the newer one 9, so a set of all inks will set you back a few hundred dollars. (NNTR (no need to respond)

  29. Richard Hutson

    November 30, 2021 at 03:08

    I echo what Bill said about your commentary, and I also use the star rating method in my initial review of a photo shoot, although I really do like the “meh – solid – personal best” analogy. I also like your eye for simplicity and graphic design in your editing process. It really bugs me when perspective is not properly aligned, and when the four corners are not used to anchor the image. I have had a camera in my hands ever since I could hold my mother’s little Kodak Brownie but it was only about six years ago, at age 75, that I got serious about making photographs. I admire the enthusiasm and sense of humor that you bring into your art. I’m looking forward to your next photo walk and the images that you create.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 30, 2021 at 16:04

      Thanks so much for your wonderful comment, Richard, and I’m pleased to hear that you appreciate my approach to photography! It sounds like we are kindred spirits, as I’ve had a lifelong love of photography as well but only got serious about it not even ten years ago. And I think that may be one of the reasons for my “enthusiasm and sense of humor”, because I never set out to do this for a living. I do it for the pure joy I get from making images, so I’m under no pressure other than the pressure I put on myself to do it well. As far as “second acts” go, I couldn’t be more pleased that photography has turned out to be mine! I hope you enjoy the next photo walk and set of images.

      Reply
  30. peter van eekelen

    November 30, 2021 at 22:36

    Loved your results sharing of your first photowalk. This does not happen too often to me, but over 90% of the time you expressed my thoughts exactly. The other 10 percent, well let’s have coffe sometimes (in Amsterdam please :-D). I very much look forward to your next shoot!

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 30, 2021 at 23:54

      Peter, thanks for your comment! I’m dying to know what the 10% is, LOL. I think more of us are kindred spirits than we realize, and I hope you enjoy the next shoot! I sure did!

      Reply
  31. Elizabeth+Klanac

    November 30, 2021 at 23:19

    Cynthia, in video 2, that looks like a wonderful place to photograph… I’m so happy that we got to go along on this walk with you… I appreciate  your excitement. I too am a big fan of naked trees. There is something so statuesque and wonderfully graphic about them…
    I love compositions with the scaffolding and propped porches etc. They have such potential for wonderful stories. I know that I would have a field day here as well. I appreciate your efforts and being out in the windy elements, that’s what happens with photography. We are willing to brave the wet, the wind and the heat…
    Excellent job…

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      November 30, 2021 at 23:55

      Thanks for watching, Elizabeth, and for your wonderful comment. Fort Hancock is a great place to photograph, but I like the place I went on my second photowalk even better! I hope you’ll get a chance to view that one as well!

      Reply
  32. Sonja Bowden

    December 1, 2021 at 01:29

    This series has been thoroughly enjoyable, Cynthia. I appreciate how you shared both your RAW and processed photos in Phase 3. We give a lot of our heart and soul to each image, from choosing our subjects to visualizing and framing to artistically post-processing. You have conveyed that well. I also appreciate how supportive you are of other photographers.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      December 1, 2021 at 16:40

      Sonja, thanks so much for following along, and for your kind words! I’m enjoying this so much so it means a lot to hear that people are actually enjoying the results. 2 more to go!

      Reply
  33. Paul Lewis

    December 2, 2021 at 23:44

    So interesting, this is so interesting following you in your quest for photographs, and understanding what you are looking for, how you work the scene, sometimes fast, other times trying different views, understanding how you work and why you work the way you do. It is fantastic being able to walk in your shoes, and piggyback on your mind, in a sense. I love watching the photo walk in Fort Hancock. Fantastic and instructive. Thanks for sharing what isn’t usually shared, for our benefit.

    Reply
    • Cynthia+Gladis

      December 3, 2021 at 14:56

      Paul, thank you for your wonderful comment, and I appreciate that you watched. I enjoy exploring on my photowalks, even if I explore places I’ve been before. It truly is my favorite way to shoot, and I’m so pleased that you enjoyed following along with me on this one! I have one more to go, and for the this next one I was fortunate to get an unseasonably mild, sunny day, which is my absolute favorite. So, very different images — should be interesting!

      Reply

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